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in washington, d.c. and an example of a dysfunctional process. that threatens our economy and millions of people across our economy. pete: is stalemate in washington stifling the economic recovery? joining us this thanksgiving week, peter baker of "the new york times." molly ball of "the atlantic." and jim tankersly of "national journal." >> award winning reporting and analysis. covering history as it happens. from our nationas capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe the people of boeing are working together. to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875, we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years, from insurance to investment
could hurt them as a result hurt them and the jobs and economy. you can see what is happening with our twinkie and hostess and all . people who make them. they are out of the a job because of union workers who are demanding more. be lucky you have a job right now. >> wayne, if you look at thanksgiving to news years. and this is it super bowl for retailers for profits and unions know that and the timing is rough, don't you think? >> i don't see it that way. timing is off. you have merchandise in the tore right now. you caint sell it for the holiday season. what happens on black friday and going forward into the christmas season. all of that merchandise has to be here. you have to ordered that months ago. these strikes are not hurting it hurts the walmart protest that could hurt shopping. port authority in oakland not necessarily behaved. they are one of the mot notorous unions. >> and at the same time certainly labor has a right to have their voice and issues whether it is health care or pay. >> they are choosing america's holiday season to get their message across and get their employe
, they have, but, i guess we're fortune in our overall economy, 150 million workers only now at about a 9 or 10% union total labor force, so, on relative basis we would be much better or worse time since 1980 whi we were opposed to 26, 27, in the states, intriguingly, the states are not right to work states where unions can force a company to, people to pay dues et cetera, those states are falling behind. the empirical evidence, the more these guys get power the less the jobs get created. >> looking forward, not just now. we know that unions feel more empowered and their presidential candidate won the white saying they're going to congress and ask for easier ways for companies to become unionized. so, can we expect to see more of these plays against companies? >> absolutely, for the exact reason you noted. unions were obviously a big supporter of obama and the liberal agenda, and rightly so because they've worked nicely with each other, but as unions become bigger and bigger, bigger and the 9, 10% that toby said, it tends to work the opposite of what we want to see happen to jobs and unem
's what gets the economy going at a rate that we haven't yet enjoyed so far in this recovery. >> so why? why then, dan, are we feeling this way? you share the view that we are not -- you're not done with the fiscal cliff. we're not going to suddenly solve our fiscal problems. we certainly haven't been talking enough on the spending side. there seems to be movement toward the idea that some people's taxes will go up at the high end. middle class won't see much of a tax increase. why the optimism? are we justified? >> well, i think the typical consumer is not like you and me and our other guests here. the typical median income is $60,000 a year for a family. they're not getting a lot of money from capital gains and dividends. they're not freaked out at the prospect of those going up. they're concerned about what is in their paycheck. paychecks are morsteady than they had been any time the last few years. wages are going up a little bit. the biggest asset that anybody owns is a house. we finally seem -- it's not just the value of sales rising and construction but home values. and so with e
to get this engi and the economy pumping again. neil: do you think, and this is mentioned by mitt romney a lot. you know that you are going to do things differently? dubai that? >> everybody talks about reducing taxes because they want more capital to grow their business. but it's also regulations. businesses are confronted at the township and city level. >> here in chicago, you need 161 licenses to open up the business. >> if you open up a jobshop, you have to have a license to give them a bath. it's ridiculous. why can't we consolidate some of these things and reduce the bureaucracy? it isn't about the people collecting anything but a paycheck. neil: they must alize tat the more they push this, the more it it eangers the economy and their very jobs are online. >>ou would think so, when you? there is a lot of evidence that says those pople inside the beltway are living in a bubble. washington dc is the only city in the united states thahas had taken continuous growthh >> what about when gas comes down? >> you have a gas situation where you have $4000 and their wages have only gone up ab
and a bad deal for the economy? well, let's ask. ben stein, dagen mcdowell, charlie gasperino and gary k. want to start with you. bad deal for all of us? >> of course, look, business investment was already down last quarter over 1%, and the word uncertainty just pervades the air and its business, its consumer, how about philanthropic organizations don't no what kind of write-offs for charity and the worst the outcome is probably going to be more, and taxes are going to go up and of course there will be no spending cuts. >> and ben, it does sound ominous, even if you're not someone who reads the wall street journal, the fiscal cliff, fiscal cliff, it could be the-- i don't know intimidation factor, it could actually be worse than going over the cliff. >> i think that's a brilliant point, charles. if we went over the cliff for a few months the impact would not be enormous, and uncertainty is a bad word and fear is a really, really bad words and these are the words that govern the economy today and imperative that democrats put their heart and soul into a compromise. absolutely imperative.
to the new rules about to hit our already fragile economy and as fiscal cliff talks continue, big defense cuts are still on the table. so, should republicans embrace the sequester or make a deal to avoid it? welcome to the journal, editorial report. is the obamacare a sure thing or vast expansion of medicaid, heavily dependent on state implementation and a growing number of the governors are saying they won't do the federal government's bidding. wisconsin's scott walker is one of them and joins me now, governor, great to have you with us. >> paul, good to be with you. >> paul: when you wrote to the hhs secretary kathleen sebelius, you wouldn't set up a state exchange you wouldn't have the flexibility to make it work. why don't you elaborate on what you mean by lack of flexibility. >> each of the governors who run it, a state run, partnership or referring to the federal government. any folks that have a state run exchange they need to realize in the end there is no flexibility in terms of final outcome, there is no substantive difference between the three option, all of them lead to a fede
's entire economy. we can't afford it and we can't afford to leave it intact. so try as they might, remember the last congress republicans passed a lot of bills out of the house of representatives that tore apart obama care. as even the president calls it now. they didn't go anywhere in the senate and meanwhile, alex, after the thanksgiving break, the principles are expected to get back together to begin negotiating in earnest. as you're right the clock is ticking. just a little bit more than one month to go before the nation heads over that fiscal cliff. al alex? >> 38 days and counting. thanks so much. let's go from the white house to the middle east now. palestinians and israelis are keeping a cease-fire alive. but many call the truce extremely fragile. an attempted border breach threatened the calm yesterday. israeli forces shot and killed a palestinian man. he was one of hundreds testing israeli security at the border. nbc's martin fletcher is live for us in tel aviv. good saturday morning to you, martin. can this shooting jeopardize the cease-fire? and then when does the next phase beg
to destroy the economy. no one in their right mind is going to allow that kind of increase to devastate the economy. lou: that's a good point. it's interesting that no one is talking about the fact that individual tax payment, 26% of the bush tax cuts over the past two years, the answer here is this. i just want to see everybody be happy. let me turn to benghazi. there is a palpable sense in washington dc right now. i don't believe the congress has the strength or the tools to actually penetrate the veil of denial and secrecy and opaqueness that is this administration and what it has done. now, when you think this is? >> the attorney general has to do this. lou: can you really see eric holder doing that? saying that we will investigate ourselves? >> if he doesn't do an independent investigation, you have the very people who have floated the idea of prosecuting general petraeus, there are all kinds of things they might do to him. there is all kinds of pressure that can be brought about. lou: are you saying that you don't think, i was speaking earlier with. rinsing, you don't think it's a
. and as erika miller explains, the event highlights the importance of small businesses to the nation's economy. >> reporter: tomorrow is the most important sales day of the year for pam nelson, co-owner of butter lane bakery in manhattan. >> it's our biggest day of the year. valentine's day used to be our biggest day of the year. now it is, by far, small business saturday. >> reporter: last year, sales quadrupled the saturday after thanksgiving. this year, she's hoping for even bigger gains. todd and leisl gibson are also hoping for a surge in orders tomorrow. the husband and wife team own a craft products business called leisl and company. small business saturday was also their biggest sales day last year. >> that one saturday, we did about 20 times our typical order volume for a regular saturday. >> reporter: special promotions and marketing clearly help drive sales. but the firms say customers also like supporting business owners they know. >> they like the fact that they feel like they know leisl. and they know todd. and they see pictures of our daughter. and they know when they buy patter
's economy has continued to grow while the rest of europe has slowed. >> that growth is now so minimal that economists say 2013 next year could see a return to recession. still, german businesses shrugging off that possibility. >> business managers are upbeat about their future. >> german business leaders are optimistic that exports will remain strong, and the latest figures back that up. consumer confidence is also surprisingly robust. all the talk of a crisis in the eurozone does not seem to have dented people's desire to shock, but growth overall is beginning to falter -- the talk of a crisis does not seem to have dented people's desire to shop. the eurozone as a whole has fare worse with zero growth at the start of the year and then downhill from there. that has a knock on effect for german companies. so far, though, the german economy is weathering the storm. >> that news sent stocks in germany higher in what has been a bit of a winning streak recently. our correspondent has more from frankfurt. >> traders did not spend much time looking back on the slowdown of the german economy,
have to give a comprehensive bill. >> our economy right now needs skilled workers, about people who want to come here and we should fix the system that's broken and not only that family friendly and keeps families together and some families have one member of the family come here on a green card and they have to wait several years before they're reunited and this bill corrects that. >> they can't work once they get here, but they can come and be with their families. >> gentlemen, thank you so much, good see you both. >> thank you. >> pope benedict xvi, elevating six new cardinals today. you may remember he elevated cardinals last february, but the new group is made up entirely of non-europeans including one american. and today's choice will help choose his successor. >> and with the crowning of the six new cardinals, appropriate benedict is it putting his seal on the papacy and decades to follow. appointing well over half the men who will vote for his successor. while all are fairly young, the cardinals stand out for what they're not. they're neither european or italian. and the car
, and they continue to function in an economy with china, india, south korea, and other countries nothr buying into the sanctions, and, thus, they continue to create app economy frustrate sanctions. talk about this, expose it, impose harder sanctions on iran. melissa: what is it we can do about this? >> well, you know, i think it'st more complicated than that in that first of all, turkey supposedly is in a approximatey civil war against iran and syria supporting the opposition so eitherhey are speaking the truth or openly lying, and we can have a much stronger statement from the president looking for regime change inia syria, and all the while turkey funneling millions of dollars to iran. one is a war of words.war second, is also other partners s like dubai who supposedly is ani ally that also is just a hundred miles across the sea from iran, and shifting also some of that ld to them so we have other. players. india's an ally, other allies subverting sanctions through the new identity list gold economyys providing $1 billion to $2 billion a month bypassing t sanctions. melissa: when i heard th
. we'll invent it in america and then become a service-based economy. well, here we are, and these new service sector jobs aren't paying off, literally. right now a job in the leisure and hospitality sector averages $13 an hour. that's $27,000 a year, if you work full-time. retail, not much better. average hourly rate, about $16 an hour. this is the average. it takes into account everyone from the store manager to the stock boy. let me show you one tier higher, manufacturing. bringing in almost $24 an hour on average. that's a solid $50,000 a year. that's also the median income for u.s. households. education and health services, these are important jobs for society. workers there earn an average of $24.28 an hour and also around 50 grand a year. again, if you work fulltime. then there's the very top. those are highly educated, highly skilled and highly motivated. census data show the top 20% making six figures, pulling in almost half of the income in the u.s. for this american recovery to work we need to have a middle, a big, prosperous happy middle. don't you think? it has defined gen
say that the president proposed $1.6 trillion in new revenue? he wants to destroy the economy? come on. who in their right mind will allow that kind of increase to devastate the economy. it will not be hostess going out of business. >> lou: that is a good point and it is interesting, no one is talking about the fact that individual tax payments, taxpayer payments, internal revenue service, receipts from those taxpayers have risen 26% under the bush tax cuts, over the past two years which tells us that the answer here is growth. >> that's right. >> lou: i'm a simple fellow and i'd like to see everybody start talking to each other. let me turn to benghazi, because, the special prosecutor. there is a sense of hopelessness that is palpable in washington, d.c., right now. because, i don't believe the congress feels that it has the strength or the tools to actually penetrate the veil of denial and secrecy and opaqueness that is the administration, when it comes to what it has done. witness the last nine weeks. you are calling for a special prosecutor, and the fellow who has to do that work f
. this is someone else on the investment committee said. is point was the transformation of the world economy lift poor people in china and india into the middle class and one american drops out of the middle class, that is not such a bad trade, 4-1. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company and this is a person with a charming and lovely life story, his parents were immigrants and he told me his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily for. imagine that, temporarily poor and sure enough complete rock stars, both of them went to new york. and the mass club, one brother in silicon valley and another is derivative on wall street. the technology cfo, his parents were really angry at him because he dropped out of a ph.d. program in applied math at stanford having gone to harvard to start becoming plutocrats. very hard-working guy, did smart, did great, this is what he said about the american middle-class. we are demand higher paycheck than the rest of the world. if you are going to demand ten times the paycheck you need to deliver ten times the value. it sou
and strengthening our economy by investing in jobs, not cuts. as for the effectiveness of this campaign one conservative says this type of pressure from unions is nothing new. >> the fact that they are publicly saying what they have been privately saying helps the american people undetand where ama's in trend and comes from but nothing has changed. >> the issue i in the fiscal cliff discussion democrats appear willing to put entitlements and spending on the table. republicans saying they're willing to do tax revenue and that could be or would be the key to any agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff and get the country's books back in order. gerri: you will be covering this for a long time. thanks for that. this black frida wal-mart shoppers think protests, it is not a superstore workers on the picket line. jeff flock joins us with more. ff: a few of them but the majority were not wal-mart workers but members of other unions like the teamsters, the uaw, it was built today as a demonstration against the notion of working on thursday on thanksgiving. the day before black friday. but the protest w
on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: demonstrations, clashes with the police, and tear gas in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and
the economy. american express open is here to help. that's why we are proud to present "your business" on msnbc. >>> hi, there, everyone. i'm j.j. ramberg. welcome to a very special edition of "your business." it comes in between black friday and cybermonday. this year, small business saturday is november 24th. it is a day people are urged to shop local and is support their communities. we are coming from maplewood, new jersey. a storm-battered state where small businesses need customers more than ever. across the country in burbank, california, the shop local movement has taken off in a big way. in the magnolia park section of that city, local retailers have banded together to revitalize not only sales but also their neighborhood. >>> it is the last friday of the month in the magnolia park section of burbank, california. normally, the stores would be closing and streets would be quiet but the creative small business owners here have figured out a low cost way of bringing in customers with a huge return. they call it ladies night out where people are coming out in droves to celebrate
and a snake made it back to shore safely. >>> it will be seen if black friday brought the economy out of the red. shoppers rushed a victoria secret's store in oklahoma. there was violence in other cases like this in tallahasse florida. this these people were arguing over parking and there was a shooting. several wal-mart protesters were arrested for protesting. no one was killed this year but there was violence. two people were wounded after a shooting outside a wal-mart store. it was a above a parking space. >>> and we have a little more about small business saturday. did you know that. it is between black friday and cyber monday. where everyone is encouraged to shop at mom and pop stores. and we have more on that from reporter -- who checked out some of the stores in berkley and talked to the owner how they will talk to folks and get them in the stores. >> reporter: the stores here are not here to compete with big box stores. small business saturday is about supporting the local independent stores and they in turn support the local economy and community. >> if you love the small sto
the economy? who will allow that increase to devastate the economy? lou: a good point*. nobody talks about the fact that individual top -- checks payments federal receipts has risen over the last few years that the answer is broken i went to see how they talk to each other. there is a sense of helplessness that is palpable because i don't believe the congress feels it has the strength to penetrate the veil of denial , and secrecy that is this administration over the last nine weeks and he called for the special prosecutor. >> that's right. attorney general house to do it. >> eric holder says congressman you have a splendid idea. we will investigate ourselves. >> if he does not a point* a special prosecutor then what you have is the very people who floated the idea of general petraeus for adultery in the military. there is all kinds of pressure. lou: you don't thiik it is a coincidence coming down on david petraeus head against the issue it -- issues of the administration? >> exactly. i love your sarcasm. that is the problem. we have the purse strings with the department of injustice when i
we talk about moving the needle as a whole so the industrial economy is larger. if we could take the innovation model the cultural revolution and then the internet could be the beginning. then we could see whether revolution could do. with a new industrial revolution i will look at it as the third. how this works. rear it is the quick wind. how many people think that it came in the 1700s? 1806? half of the room. 1900? of smaller group. the answer is nobody has a precise definition of the most think 1776 with the american revolution with the distinction but to have such power so we had amplified human potential and that potential meant they could be more productive and be of low entrepreneur or a cottage industry than the firepower turns into water power but that basically replaced muscle power with machine power to amplify human capacity it doubled like that in the united kingdom between 30-year 58 million and huge improved the quality of life it you may think the factories were dark satanic mills but you have access to clean water and sanitation. will also heard try. people did
comprehensive immigration reform. he sees it as a key part to stabilizing the economy, investing in the middle class, not having a subclass of 11 million people that hurt economic revitalization. for him i think it is a piece of the middle class agenda. >> are the other unions working with senator schuman who say they are starting to work on a piece of legislation? >> the majority leader and center schumer. we have some issues with this idea, but we applaud his enthusiasm. we are trying to get him on the steps of key elements that are important to us. >> where do you disagree? >> i think he thinks a national id card is required. we do nothing that needs to be part of the solution to fixing the broken immigration system. >> washington journal continues. host:jim martin n. he will be talking about the future of health care, especially the elements of the affordable care act that are put to place. guest: glad to be here. host: what does it mean in general for older americans now that the election is over? guest: i think things like obamacare, the affordable care act, seniors were opposed to it b
to raise taxes on small businesses because it would damage the economy. now he thinks this economy is stronger than it was two years ago and we are in better shape to take the economic hit. it is an interesting question. if you go over the tax cliff and taxes are raised dramatically, the house would have our past -- will already have passed. on the sequester, i thought if republicans won the house and senate of the president say, since it -- sequestration would not happen. it denied give up any of the savings from the sequestered . but did so by impacted the pentagon less heavily than the sequestered it. but divided government, i think you get the question. president said he does not want to change the money for the pentagon. mitch mcconnell said we are not raising taxes to ransom the pentagon budget cuts. a lot of focus has been on the pentagon but these are more concerned about the $50 billion in domestic discretionary spending restraint every year. you did to the republican study committee. the announced all a thing worse than sequestration would not be having savings. this stam
stores that are struggling in a tough economy. local retailers are looking for a boost they need. and ther joining us from new york with more on this effort. >> anna. >> hey, there. today is small business saturday and carries more significance. and the northeast is still reeling economically from super storm sandy. we are here in long island and the owner said sandy could not have hit at a worse time. she makes 40 percent of the sales and said it will be impossible to make up the sails and is thankful because all of the ventors are letting her delay payment. >> i was in tires actually over that. i was scared. i don't want to lose my credit and good name and repitation. they are sticking by me. >> this business is like your child. >> this is my other home. this is it my other home. >> from staten island to long island ther urging to give back and help neighborhoods devastated by the storm. it is it estimated 100 million people participated in the growing event. and the economic impact and in the 50 billion range and 12 billion in new york city alone and 20 billion. total from los
convention and james carville reminded me with all the talk about the economy that we don't live in an economy, we live in a society. i care deeply about the society we are creating and i use the word creating on purpose. today community does not happen organically. you have to be very intentional and deliberate about that, and city council is in the midst of a school reassignment process, i have learned quality is subjective, the definition of that. city council is redistricting. i have learned community is subjective. how neighborhoods are defined. i do believe in investing in infrastructure and all those things that would eradicate or mitigate a brain drain, but ultimately, i believe it doesn't matter if we have more affordable housing or better jobs or better schools. if people don't want to live here. that has everything to do with community and the soul of the city. people want to be a part of a city that is diverse and inclusive and welcoming. neighborhood is about social interaction and that is how we build community. in a city like boston that has 22 distinct neighborhoo
the economy? >> times are a little better. a little more idea last year. we can definitely spend a little more. not a lot more, but a little more. >> once we have spent enough, we stop. >> i want to make the kids happy, grandkids, that sort of thing. i am going to spend more to make everybody happy. >> that will make the retailers happy too. they have been forced to cut prices to keep hold of customers, and that has hit profits. >> retail has been tricky this year. it is not that the consumer is not spending, but they are spending in spurts. they are distracted by economic issues, political issues, even natural disaster. the consumer has found lots of reasons to spend but then stop. >> come the new year, they may have even less to spend. consumers will likely feel less well-off with coming tax hikes and spending cuts. even more reason for retailers to cash in now. >> for more on the black friday rash, i spoke a brief time ago with a bloomberg tv anger in new york. stephanie, thank you for coming in instead of doing a bit of shopping yourself. >> i am happier to be with you than wrestling at wa
then spoke of future goals for china, which is already the world's second largest economy. hu spoke bluntly of china's regional aspirations and territorial disputes with japan and other countries. hu jintao served two terms as the communist party secretary general for a total of ten years. what does this decade mean to china? >> china has faced many domestic and diplomatic challenges over the past decade, and the president, hu jintao's leadership. >> hu promoted what he called the concept of scientific development. aimed to create a harmonious society. it will be a process for slower growth. the hu administration avoided a $2-million-year-old tax based on farmers' harvest. it was part of the president's effort to narrow the economic gap between urban and rural areas. hu also worked toward a sweeping consultation of coal mines and chemical plants, which resulted in a reduction in pollution. but the president hasn't been able to control china's income disparity or corruption among its bureaucrats, and so public anger with the government is snarling. migrant workers in cities and students look
cliff it only impact certain americans with taxes increasing and it will affect our country and economy. and we need face-to-face meetings and i don't think that obamacare should be on the table. >> you do not think that obamacare should be on the table. >> no. >> i don't think that obamacare should be on the table. it's the number one priority for the lawmakers right now whether you're a democrat or a republican, this should be priority number one, it's when john boehner had the new freshman tea partiers come in in 2010 and facing the debt ceiling, he characterized the first adult moment for the new freshmen congressmen and i think this is the second adult moment. can we get beyond party politics and rigid ideology and come with a compromise that will benefit the american people? we need both to look seriously at spending cuts and revenue generation for the country right now. >> all right, so let's-- >> and let's put a couple of ideas on the table and angela, i'm surprised you would say obamacare should not be on the block, and what do you think should be on the block? what kind of-- i
economy by shopping at locally owned stores. the movement is in its third year. and it is growing. according to a new survey 67% of shopper who's know about small business saturday plan to take part in it. that's up 44% from last year. dave, i know this has made you very sad. hollywood is mourning the loss of larry hagman. >> j.r. >> wait a minute. it's your style j.r., my wife and the man who put cliff barnes in office. >> you have got plenty of trouble before y'all got married. i don't understand why you think she has changed. >> hey. stop. knock it off. >> classic. >> legend. >> hagman best known for his role of course as the villain j.r. ewing on his star with dallas. lost his battle with cancer dallas hospital. linda gray had this to say on the star's passing. larry hagman was my best friend for 35 years. he brought joy to everyone he knew. i will miss him enor muresly. >> she was at his side. >> he he was apparently surrounded by family and friends. >> hagman was the son of mary martin. he was also known for his role as major tony nelson in i dream of jeanne, of course, he w
the modern economy, you'll hear something like the following phrase. well, the last 30 years of the american political economy has been very good for consumers, but bad for workers. well, it's not like there's two parts of me. it's just the same person who is doing both of those things. the question is in total, are you better off. and jennifer is someone who runs a small business and is in the world of retail. i want to hear what your thoughts on all of this right after we take this quick break. >>> that's the video of the walmart in georgia on black friday that we were debating whether we wanted to show. so we thought -- >> we say voyeurism -- >> well, no, we said we're only going to show it if we unpack a little bit rather than just kind of throw it out and look at those crazy people. jessica, not jennifer. we're 14 minutes into the show, i got one person who wasn't arrested saying was arrested. what was your take away from the walmart action? >> i honestly think it's inspiring. we were talking about this a moment ago. i think like the occupy movement, even if it's a sort of a symbolic mo
economy, horrible unemployment numbers and shouldn't have been that difficult. >> and the republicans do revert back and try and say that we should try to get everyone get along and that wasn't president obama's approach. >> what i've learned from the results of this election is if i was somebody trying to get mitt romney elected tell the biography, this is one of the best biographies and resume's to return for president, i would have spent time even if it goes over a guy like mine's head, tell us about the companies and things you've done for people. and in the 30's, people were wondering you, how are you going to support four kids, and you found time to be a bishop in a church. and yes, the word mormon may have come up. >> and they broke the rule, you define yourself positively first, they allowed the obama people to define them for months, why they didn't put on the bio spot for me one of the greatest questions in politics. >> because the buyo spot. >> do you agree? >> absolutely right. and he has a great resume', but that's not what was going to win the election. what was going to wi
. everyday you see all the ways all of us at us bank are helping grow our economy. lending more so companies and communities can expand, grow stronger and get back to work. everyday you see all of us serving you, around the country, around the corner. us bank. [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing toda i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. [ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million older americans don't have enough to eat. anything else? no, not today. join me, aarp, and aarp foundation in the drive to end hunger by visiting in the drive to end hunger trying to find a better job can be frustrating. so at university of phoenix we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum. so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, blo
a lot of money in aid, $3 billion a year from the united states and he has a very fragile economy. but i'd like to go back to president obama. and he is getting praise from critics even on the right who saw that his first administration, he himself said that in order to be able to influence israel, that the united states needed to create daylight with israel. well, now it appears that he has reversed that position and his position now is that the united states needs to back israel, and as he said over and over and over, israel has a right to defend itself. >> so israel has elections coming up in january. maria, how do you think this is all going to play out in that election? >> i think that this incident, again, like i said in my first answer to you, netanyahu comes out looking very, very strong. and in fact, his opponent, who was as i understand going to announce a run against netanyahu before all of this started, has now backed down, and now it might be too late for him to announce anything, for anyone to announce rung against netanyahu, and he certainly has been strengthened. he showe
of these mom and pop shops could tell us a lot about the entire economy. we'll take look into the future. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] dayquil doesn't treat that. huh? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus rushes relief to all your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! can i still ship a gift in time r christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the best devices on the best network. exclusively at verizon. >> heather: today is small business saturday. even president obama taking parted, taking his daughters to an independent bookstore in arlington, virginia today. this is why, small businesses are so important to our nation's economy. take a look at these numbers.
to achieve efficiencies in economy of scales we think in workers compensation for the cities you have the report before you the budget department has made some excellent recommendations which we are planning to administrator as part of this contract. >> would you look to add anything to that brief presentation? >>> i would just concur we have two separate workers compensation for the m ta and for the rest of the 70 and milky and i talked about this a year and decided that we could do better for all of the cities by joining force and is i had experience in my last role of finding ways of reducing workers compensation costs has been going down for many city agency and is the workers comp sayings has been going up for the m ta and so there is benefit for all of us coming together and that will save us all some money. >> okay do we have a budget analysis report? . >> good afternoon madame chair and supervisor kim and we have made some recommendation that is d h r is in concor dance with and by $799 to account to the december 1st start date of the agreement with us and m ta and to
facts. two billion dollars in direct spending in san francisco economy has already been lost. between 2010 and 2019 because the center was not big enough. these were groups that would have come to san francisco but decided not to because there was not enough space. the increase and average daily rate will be immediate and a long term, each time that we expanded and build one of the two buildings in the past, mascony, south, north and west, the revenue has grown and sustained itself and we believe that it will continue to happen with this next expansion, the revenue per room is the way that you value the hotel revenue is expected toin crease, 6.7 to 5.5 percent. that converts into hotel tax into the city's general fund. the occupantcy will grow to 86 percent when the expansion grows. >> the projected occupantcy of the rooms? >> since the rooms is where it comes from, we have to say that the hotel will benefit from the assessment. >> where is it at? >> 1.5 percent. >> what is the occupantcy? >> it is about 80 percent this year. >> 79, 80 percent, thank you. >> excuse me, office of econo
. but the over all economy. this is a large cost. look at current recovery since june 2009 and since that time median incomes are down 4600 on average. during the recession. they were down on average 2800. and so it was a great cost. >> and when you hear free from the government reach for your wallet and you will be paying for it if you are a taxpayer. college students and parents fed up with soaring tuition and crying foul. but some in the forbes team say it is it great for students and could lower tuition . there is it a flip side you don't want to miss and that's next d. ♪ [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends dember 7th. so now's the time. visit or call 1-800-medicare. >> live from america's head quarters. i am healther childers. new develop am middle east as violent protest erupted in egypt over preside
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